Category Archives: Interior Design

Oct 20, 2018

Today, we are sharing a very easy and affordable way to turn your tabletop into holiday perfection. It’s so easy we were able to whip this up in our office before a little holiday Soiree lunch. We used things readily available, and often lying around. This time of year when decorating at home or the office, I’ve found that I often have to trim bottom branches of the tree, or pieces fall off the pine garlands.  Taking these and doing something different with them instead of tossing them is what inspired this idea!

My kids love pears, so we always have them around the house. So, we took pears, and the extra tree trimmings and spray painted them gold.  Of course, Copper (our new favorite metallic), rose gold, or silver would all be lovely as well.  I took the color inspiration from the plates I wanted to use, so if you’re stuck making that decision, look there for an idea (or a napkin, table linen, or whatnot).

While you may not favor them for everyday table use, colored candles can be an easy way to add an out of the ordinary pop of color. I’ve been seeing them more and more at local gift store, etc, but our favorite source for them is Creative Candles.

The rest is up to your imagination to play… We took a very small dish for stacking our centerpiece, but a large clear bowl, or something with embellishments would all be really lovely. I always like mixing candles- votives with tapers, etc to fill up the table, use enough so that a bright overhead light isn’t necessary.

And, of course, there are so so many ways to embellish or “juge” up each place setting. I always find that this is one of the main ways at our weddings that makes guests feel special. Seeing their name written in a special way, or on a unique item (a leaf, a stone, or maybe even a ribbon used to tie the napkins). These looked great mixed on the table, and were straight from the yard- a simple camelilia bloom, or a sprig of your favorite greenery.

We’d love to see some of your favorite tabletop designs, share with us some of the ones you were proud of, or loved creating.

10.20.18   |   TARA GUÉRARD
Entertaining, Event Design, Event Planning, Food and Drink, Interior Design, Parties | Comments >>
Oct 20, 2018

22062_2a_kiss.©LizBanfield

Today’s feature is a blast from the past summertime wedding at Drayton Hall Plantation featuring gerber daisy designs. Our bride,  a well known Charleston interior designer, was  a great collaborator and serious about her guests having fun. The result was a playful but classic Southern wedding under the Oaks. Thank you to Liz Banfield for the photos.

Printing Collage

A simple gerber motif gave the classic invitations and ceremony programs by Lettered Olive a hint of sweetness…

Bridal Collage

Liz was able to capture some amazing portraits of the bride inside the historic plantation house. We went with brights and colors for the wedding party, so traditional white fit the perfect bill for this bride’s bouquet.

wedding party Collage

22077_8a_chairs.©LizBanfield

ceremony Collage

The wedding ceremony was held under one of the oldest live oaks on the property with a gospel choir providing some hymns during. We lined the aisle with varying shades of gerber daisy heads for a subtle pop of color. And, for the “reserved” rows of family, wide satin ribbon tied around the chair backs also had a gerber daisy detail.

22089_31_wave.©LizBanfield

Reception Collage

Afterwards, a tented reception was held along the riverbanks.  Seating vignettes were placed throughout so as guests tried the varying food stations, they could grab a quick seat to eat.

22084_34a_cuttingcake.©LizBanfield

A tired cake separated by rows of gerber daisies found a pretty home inside a canopied display… We like to take bridesmaids’ bouquets and place them around the cake table also to add some floral elements.

Daisy Collage

Gerber daisy details throughout the wedding included candles inside tall glass cylinders with small gerbers glued along the top, lampshades with real daisies attached, floral tie backs covering all of the tent legs, and pretty floral “tree” centerpieces.

22086_36a_tables.©LizBanfield

Once the dancing began, the tent was turned into a sultry late night lounge with a packed dance floor!

22324_34_spin.©LizBanfield

getaway CollageFor the Sparkler send off, we built a large display full of daisies growing out of rye grass. Guests were able to grab their sparklers on the way out to see off the bride and groom…

10.20.18   |   TARA GUÉRARD
Charleston, Event Design, Event Planning, Flowers, Interior Design, Photographers, Reception, Uncategorized, Weddings | 1 Comment
Oct 20, 2018

2016_Laura_Skip_1038

photo by Corbin Gurkin

We loved sharing our tips on mixing old and new for your tabletops with Architectural Digest. So, today we’re also passing on some more of these tips to you. Above, complimentary patterns are at play here- mixing older or more recognizable patterns like the blue and white toile plates with fresher or more modern patterns like on the linen fabric. And, adding a lamp or overhead light in combination with candles adds a completely unexpected touch.

Liz Banfield 1

photo by Liz Banfield

Ways to mix on a more simple and refined level are by letting one or two items provide the depth of the design and then balancing with lighter looks. Here, the modern gold flatware seems a bit heavier and the flowers provide a rich color and texture focal point, so mixing in delicate crystal and china here was key.

Screen-Shot-2016-10-27-at-1.23.01-PM

photo by Corbin Gurkin

Playing off of our Arch Digest quote of mixing shiny with not so shiny, bright and not bright, we set this table with an eclectic mix. A rustic concrete urn with natural succulents provides a great balance to the shine of the modern gold bowls and flatware.  I really like mixing rustic with glamorous or using materials that can be both like suedes and leathers, and stones like marble and agate.

10.20.18   |   TARA GUÉRARD
Entertaining, Event Design, Event Planning, Interior Design, Parties, Press, Uncategorized, Weddings | Comments >>